Twins vs Twin – What’s the difference?

twins | twin |

As nouns the difference between
twins
and
twin

is that
twins
is while
twin
is either of two people (or, less commonly, animals) who shared the same uterus at the same time; one who was born at the same birth as a sibling.

As verbs the difference between
twins
and
twin

is that
twins
is (twin) while
twin
is (transitive|obsolete|outside|scotland) to separate, divide.

Other Comparisons: What’s the difference?

twins

English

twin

English

Alternative forms

* twynne (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)

  • Either of two people (or, less commonly, animals) who shared the same uterus at the same time; one who was born at the same birth as a sibling.
  • Either of two similar or closely related objects, entities etc.
  • A room in a hotel, guesthouse, etc. with two beds; a twin room.
  • (US) A twin size mattress or a bed designed for such a mattress.
  • A twin crystal.
  • (modifier) Forming a pair of twins.
  • the twin boys
  • (modifier) Forming a matched pair.
  • twin socks

    Derived terms

    * conjoined twin * identical twin * Siamese twin *twincest

    Synonyms

    * twindle, twinling, doublet (in the sense of twins and triplets)

    See also

    * twyndyllyng * (hotel room) single, double * twain

    Verb

    (twinn)

  • (transitive, obsolete, outside, Scotland) To separate, divide.
  • (intransitive, obsolete, outside, Scotland) To split, part; to go away, depart.
  • (usually in the passive) To join, unite; to form links between (now especially of two places in different countries).
  • Placetown in England is twinned with Machinville in France.
    For example, Coventry twinned with Dresden as an act of peace and reconciliation, both cities having been heavily bombed during the war.
  • * Tennyson
  • Still we moved / Together,
    twinned
    , as horse’s ear and eye.
  • To give birth to twins.
  • *
    1874
    , Thomas Hardy,
    Far from the Madding Crowd
  • “I’ve run to tell ye,” said the junior shepherd, supporting his exhausted youthful frame against the doorpost, “that you must come directly. Two more ewes have
    twinned

    — that’s what’s the matter, Shepherd Oak.”
  • (obsolete) To be born at the same birth.
  • (Shakespeare)